Songs

The Songs

Jazz standards are musical compositions that are widely known, performed and recorded by jazz artists as part of the genre’s musical repertoire. This list includes compositions written in the 1920s that are considered standards by at least one major fake book publication or reference work. Some of the tunes listed were already well-known standards by the 1930s, while others were popularized later. The time of the most influential recordings of a song, where appropriate, is indicated on the list.

The period from the end of the World War I until the start of the Great Depression in 1929 is known as the “Jazz Age“. Jazz had become popular music in the United States, although older generations considered the music immoral and threatening to old cultural values.[3] Dances such as the Charleston and the Black Bottom were very popular during the period, and jazz bands typically consisted of seven to twelve musicians. Important orchestras in New York were led by Fletcher Henderson, Paul Whiteman and Duke Ellington. Many New Orleans jazzmen had moved to Chicago during the late 1910s in search of employment; among others, the New Orleans Rhythm Kings, King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band and Jelly Roll Morton recorded in the city. However, Chicago’s importance as a center of jazz music started to diminish toward the end of the 1920s in favor of New York.[4]

In the early years of jazz, record companies were often eager to decide what songs were to be recorded by their artists. Popular numbers in the 1920s were pop hits such as “Sweet Georgia Brown“, “Dinah” and “Bye Bye Blackbird“. The first jazz artist to be given some liberty in choosing his material was Louis Armstrong, whose band helped popularize many of the early standards in the 1920s and 1930s.[5]

Some compositions written by jazz artists have endured as standards, including Fats Waller‘s “Honeysuckle Rose” and “Ain’t Misbehavin’“. The most recorded 1920s standard is Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish‘s “Stardust“.[6] Several songs written by Broadway composers in the 1920s have become standards, such as George and Ira Gershwin‘s “The Man I Love” (1924), Irving Berlin‘s “Blue Skies” (1927) and Cole Porter‘s “What Is This Thing Called Love?” (1929). However, it was not until the 1930s that musicians became comfortable with the harmonic and melodic sophistication of Broadway tunes and started including them regularly in their repertoire.[4]

1920–1923

1924–1925

1926–1927

1928

  • An American in Paris“, by George Gershwin, is a classical jazz tone poem. The concert premiere of the piece on December 13, 1928 was by the New York Philharmonic, conducted by Walter Damrosch. The radio premiere was by Nathaniel Shilkret on the La Touraine broadcast on January 30, 1929[105], and the first recording was by Shilkret conducting the Victor Symphony Orchestra on February 4, 1929[106]. The Shilkret recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1997.
  • Basin Street Blues[8][107][108] is a blues song written by Spencer Williams and introduced by Louis Armstrong. Trombonist and singer Jack Teagarden recorded the song several times, first in 1929 with the Louisiana Rhythm Kings. Teagarden’s 1931 recording with The Charleston Chasers, led by Benny Goodman, popularized the song. An additional verse was later added by Teagarden and Glenn Miller, who also claimed to have written the lyrics for the chorus.[109]
  • Crazy Rhythm[47] is a show tune composed by Roger Wolfe Kahn and Joseph Meyer with lyrics by Irving Caesar. It was introduced in the Broadway musical Here’s Howe by Ben Bernie, who also made a successful vocal recording.[110] Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra recorded it the same year with vocalist Franklyn Baur. The song has inspired the names of several albums, jazz groups, organizations and nightclubs.[111]
  • Creole Love Call[112][113] is a jazz composition by Duke Ellington, James “Bubber” Miley and Rudy Jackson.[114] It was based on the melody of “Camp Meeting Blues” by Joe “King” Oliver.[115] Ellington’s recording is known for the wordless vocal performance by Adelaide Hall.[114][116] The tune is also known as “Creole Love Song”.[112]
  • If I Had You” is a popular ballad by Irving King (a pseudonym for James Campbell and Reginald Connelly) and Ted Shapiro. It was popularized in Britain by Al Bowlly with Fred Elizalde and His Orchestra, and shortly thereafter by Rudy Vallée in the United States. It was marketed as “the favorite fox-trot of the Prince of Wales“. The first jazz recording was made in 1941 by Benny Goodman’s sextet. Art Blakey recorded a memorable ballad version with saxophonist Lou Donaldson in 1954.[117]
  • Lover, Come Back to Me[118] is a show tune from the Broadway show The New Moon, composed by Sigmund Romberg with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. Paul Whiteman, the Arden-Ohman Orchestra and Rudy Vallée all recorded hit versions in 1929 while the musical was running. Billie Holiday performed the song on several records, first in 1944.[119] Nat King Cole revived the song in 1953.[120] A part of the composition was based on Pyotr Tchaikovsky‘s Barcarolle.[119][120]
  • Mack The Knife” is a song from The Threepenny Opera, composed by Kurt Weill with lyrics by Bertolt Brecht. Originally called “Die Moritat von Mackie Messer” in German, the song was translated into English by Marc Blitzstein in 1954. The first jazz recording was made by Sidney Bechet in 1954 under the title “La Complainte de Mackie”. Louis Armstrong’s 1955 version established the song’s popularity in the jazz world.[121] It is also known as “The Ballad of Mack the Knife”.[121]
  • Nagasaki[122] is a jazz song composed by Harry Warren with lyrics by Mort Dixon. It was first recorded by Friar’s Society Orchestra.[123] The Ipana Troubadors made a hit recording in 1928.[124] The most famous jazz versions were recorded by Benny Goodman in 1936 and 1947.[124] Fletcher Henderson played it in 1934 in the Harlem Opera House as the “national anthem of Harlem”.[125]
  • Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise[8][126] is a song from the Broadway show The New Moon, composed by Sigmund Romberg with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. The first jazz recording was made by Artie Shaw in 1938.[127] The tune was a regular number in the Modern Jazz Quartet‘s repertoire; it was already considered a standard when the group recorded their first rendition in 1952.[128][129]
  • Sweet Lorraine[130] is a song composed by Cliff Burwell with lyrics by Mitchell Parish. Teddy Wilson‘s version was the first to make the pop charts in 1935.[131] The song is closely associated with Nat King Cole, who recorded it in 1940 and several times afterwards.[131] According to a common story, Cole’s singing career started in 1938 when a drunk customer insisted on the pianist singing “Sweet Lorraine” during a show.[131][132]

1929

  • Ain’t Misbehavin’[47][133][134] is a song from the musical revue Hot Chocolates, composed by Fats Waller and Harry Brooks with lyrics by Andy Razaf. Leo Reisman and His Orchestra was the first to take the song to the pop charts in 1929, followed by several artists including Bill Robinson, Gene Austin and Louis Armstrong. At the intermission of Hot Chocolates at the Hudson Theatre, Armstrong made his Broadway debut playing a trumpet solo on the song.[135] Waller’s original instrumental recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1984.[69]
  • Black and Blue[136][137] is a song from the musical Hot Chocolates, composed by Fats Waller with lyrics by Harry Brooks and Andy Razaf. It was introduced by Louis Armstrong. Ethel Waters’s 1930 version became a hit.[138] The song is also known as “What Did I Do to Be So Black and Blue”.[138]
  • Honeysuckle Rose[8][47][139][140] is a song from the musical revue Load of Coal, composed by Fats Waller with lyrics by Andy Razaf. It was popularized by Fletcher Henderson and His Orchestra in 1933.[141] Waller’s 1934 recording of the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999.[69] Benny Goodman’s Orchestra played a 16-minute jam session on the tune in their 1938 Carnegie Hall concert, featuring members from the bands of Count Basie and Duke Ellington. Charlie Parker used a part of the song’s harmony in “Scrapple from the Apple” (1947).[141]
  • Just You, Just Me[142] is a song from the film Marianne, composed by Jesse Greer with lyrics by Raymond Klages. It was introduced by Marion Davies and Cliff Edwards. Lester Young recorded the tune several times. Thelonious Monk‘s 1948 composition “Evidence” was loosely based on it.[143]
  • Liza (All the Clouds’ll Roll Away)” is a show tune from the Broadway musical Show Girl, composed by George Gershwin with lyrics by Ira Gershwin and Gus Kahn. It was introduced on stage by Ruby Keeler and Dixie Dugan, accompanied by the Duke Ellington Orchestra.[144][145] Keeler’s husband and popular singer Al Jolson appeared at the opening performance and sang a chorus of the song from the third row, creating a sensation and popularizing the song.[144]
  • Mean to Me[146][147] is a song composed by Fred E. Ahlert with lyrics by Roy Turk. It was first recorded by Ruth Etting. The song was a regular number in Billie Holiday’s repertoire, and Holiday’s 1937 recording with saxophonist Lester Young is considered the definitive vocal version. Young later made an instrumental recording with Nat King Cole and Buddy Rich.[148]
  • More Than You Know[8][149] is a Broadway show tune composed by Vincent Youmans with lyrics by Edward Eliscu and Billy Rose. Introduced by Mayo Methot in Great Day, the song became a hit even though the musical only lasted for 29 performances. Ruth Etting took it to number nine in 1930, and saxophonist Benny Carter played an acclaimed trumpet solo on his 1939 recording, despite the trumpet not being his main instrument.[150]
  • Rockin’ Chair[151][152][153] is a song by Hoagy Carmichael. It was first recorded by Louis Armstrong in a duet with the composer.[154] Carmichael has said that he wrote the song as a kind of sequel to his 1926 “Washboard Blues“, which had lyrics by Fred Callahan.[155] The song was made famous by Mildred Bailey, who used it as her theme song.[156] Bailey’s first hit recording was made in 1937.[157]
  • Stardust[8][158][159] is a song composed by Hoagy Carmichael with lyrics by Mitchell Parish. Originally recorded by Carmichael as a mid-tempo jazz instrumental, the 1930 romantic ballad rendition by Isham Jones and His Orchestra became a top-selling hit. Louis Armstrong recorded an influential ballad rendition in 1931. The song is arguably the most recorded popular song, and one of the top jazz standards. Billboard magazine conducted a poll of leading disk jockeys in 1955 on the “popular song record of all time”; four different renditions of “Stardust” made it to the list, including Glenn Miller’s (1941) at third place and Artie Shaw’s (1940) at number one.[160] The title was spelled “Star Dust” in the 1929 publication, and both spellings are used.
  • What Is This Thing Called Love?[47] is a song written by Cole Porter for the musical revue Wake Up and Dream. It was introduced by Elsie Carlisle in London. Ben Bernie’s and Fred Rich‘s recordings made the charts in 1930. One of the best-known instrumental versions was recorded by Clifford Brown and Max Roach with Sonny Rollins in 1956. The song’s chord progression has inspired several later compositions, including Tadd Dameron‘s bebop standard “Hot House“.[161]

Songs from 1930’s

There’s a reason the 1930’s were coined the “The Great Song Era”. Most of the well known composers were at their peak as was the Hollywood Musical, Broadway and Radio. Here’s a list of the most popular tunes from the 1930’s

Biggest hit songs

The following songs achieved the highest sales in 1930 on the major record labels in the United States (i.e. Victor, Brunswick and Columbia). Record sales continued at 1929 levels up until July of 1930. In the autumn of 1930 the Great Depression began in earnest for the majority of the public who finally began to feel the economic downturn. This caused record sales to plummet in August and they would remain low for the remainder of the year.

Month Artist Title Record Label Country Notes
January Helen Morgan Why Was I Born? and Don’t Ever Leave Me Victor United States Helen Morgan sings her songs from the hit show Sweet Adeline.
January Dick Robertson Singin’ in the Bathtub and Lady Luck Brunswick United States From the film The Show of Shows.
January Leo Reisman Orchestra Why Was I Born? and Here I Am[disambiguation needed] Victor United States Written by Jerome Kern for the show Sweet Adeline.
January Roger Wolfe Kahn Orchestra Why Was I Born? and Here I Am[disambiguation needed] Brunswick United States Written by Jerome Kern for the show Sweet Adeline.
January Nat Shilkret Orchestra Don’t Ever Leave Me and Twas Not Long Ago Victor United States Written by Jerome Kern for the show Sweet Adeline.
January Paul Whiteman Orchestra Great Day[disambiguation needed] and Without a Song Columbia United States From the Broadway show Great Day[disambiguation needed].
January Victor Arden and Phil Ohman Orchestra Why? and It’s You I Love Victor United States From the 1929-30 Broadway musical Sons o’ Guns.
January Rudy Vallee Orchestra A Little Kiss Each Morning and I’ll Be Reminded Of You Victor United States From the musical film starring Rudy Vallee: The Vagabond Lover.
January Meyer Davis and Earl Burtnett Orchestras My Fate Is In Your Hands and Look What You’ve Done To Me Brunswick United States
January Guy Lombardo Orchestra My Fate Is In Your Hands and A Little Kiss Each Morning Columbia United States Second song from the musical film: The Vagabond Lover.
February The Revelers Chant of the Jungle and Waiting At The End of the Road Victor United States From the musical films: Untamed and Hallelujah.
February Marion Harris Nobody’s Using It Now and Funny, Dear, What Love Can Do Brunswick United States First song from the musical film: Playboy Of Paris.
February Marion Harris Nobody’s Sweetheart and My Fate Is in Your Hands Brunswick United States
February Leo Reisman Orchestra Shepherd’s Serenade and Charming Victor United States From the musical film: Devil-May-Care.
February Leo Reisman Orchestra I’ll See You Again and If Love Were All Victor United States From Noel Coward’s musical comedy Bitter Sweet.
February Roger Wolfe Kahn Orchestra Don’t Ever Leave Me and Twas Not Long Ago Victor United States Written by Jerome Kern for the show Sweet Adeline.
February Leo Reisman Orchestra You Do Something To Me and You’ve Got That Thing Victor United States Written by Cole Porter for the show Fifty Million Frenchmen.
February A. & P. Gypsies Orchestra South Sea Rose and Only The Girl Brunswick United States Orchestra conducted by Harry Horlick.
February Nat Shilkret Orchestra Rogue Song and When I’m Looking At You Victor United States From the musical film: The Rogue Song.
February Ben Bernie Orchestra Crying For The Carolines and Have A Little Faith In Me Brunswick United States From the musical film: Spring Is Here.
February Waring’s Pennsylvanians Crying For The Carolines and Have A Little Faith In Me Victor United States From the musical film: Spring Is Here.
February Guy Lombardo Orchestra Crying For The Carolines and Have A Little Faith In Me Columbia United States From the musical film: Spring Is Here.
February Victor Arden and Phil Ohman Orchestra Should I? and A Bundle Of Old Love Letters Victor United States From the musical film: Lord Byron Of Broadway.
February Jesse Stafford Orchestra The Woman In The Shoe and A Bundle Of Old Love Letters Brunswick United States From the musical film: Lord Byron Of Broadway.
February Paul Specht Orchestra I’m Following You and I’m Sailing On A Sunbeam Columbia United States From the musical film: It’s a Great Life.
February Rudy Vallee Orchestra Gypsy Dream Rose and Mary, I Love Y-O-U Victor United States
March Lawrence Tibbett The White Dove and When I’m Looking At You Victor United States Lawrence Tibbett sings his songs from the musical film: The Rogue Song; both songs accompanied orchestra directed Nathaniel (Nat) Shillkret .
March Lawrence Tibbett The Rogue Song and The Narrative Victor United States Lawrence Tibbett sings his songs from the musical film: The Rogue Song; both songs accompanied orchestra directed Nathaniel (Nat) Shilkret .
March Ruth Etting If He Cared and Crying For The Carolines Columbia United States From the musical films: Devil-May-Care and Spring Is Here.
March Paul Whiteman Song Of India and Liebestraum Columbia United States Modern “up to date” versions of oldtime classics.
March Ipana Troubadours I Want To Be Happy and Tea For Two Columbia United States From the musical film: No No Nanette.
March Victor Arden and Phil Ohman Orchestra Strike Up the Band and Soon Victor United States Composed by George Gershwin for the musical: Strike Up the Band.
March Leo Reisman Orchestra What Is This Thing Called Love? and She’s Such a Comfort to Me Victor United States From the musical: Wake Up and Dream.
March Ben Selvin Orchestra Why? and Cross Your Fingers Columbia United States From the Broadway musical Sons o’ Guns.
March George Olsen Orchestra T’aint No Sin and Can’t You Understand? Victor United States First composed by Walter Donaldson.
April John McCormack A Pair of Blue Eyes and I Feel You Near Me Victor United States From the musical film Song O’ My Heart.
April John McCormack The Rose of Tralee and Ireland, Mother Ireland Victor United States From the musical film Song O’ My Heart; both songs accompanied orchestra directed Nathaniel (Nat Shilkret).
April Al Jolson To My Mammy and When the Little Red Roses Get the Blues for You Brunswick United States From the musical films Mammy and Hold Everything.
April Al Jolson Looking at You and Let Me Sing and I’m Happy Brunswick United States From the musical film Mammy.
April Brevities Male Quartet The Woman in the Shoe and Wrapped in a Red, Red Rose Brunswick United States From the musical films Lord Byron Of Broadway and Blaze o’ Glory.
April Chester Gaylord Under a Texas Moon and When I’m Looking at You Brunswick United States From the musical films Under a Texas Moon and The Rogue Song.
April Fannie Brice Cooking Breakfast for the One I Love and When a Woman Loves a Man Victor United States From the musical film Be Yourself!.
April Tom Gerun Orchestra Sing, You Sinners and In My Little Hope Chest Brunswick United States From the musical film Honey.
April Bernie Cummins Orchestra Everybody Tap and Lucky Little Devil Victor United States First song from the musical film Chasing Rainbows.
April Ben Bernie Orchestra Song of the Bayou and Black Eyes Victor United States First song won the Victor Company’s $5,000 prize for best short jazz composition.
April Ben Bernie Orchestra Thank Your Father and Good for You, Bad for Me Victor United States From the Musical Comedy Flying High.
April Guy Lombardo Orchestra Lazy Lou’siana Moon and The Moon is Low Columbia United States Second song from the musical film Montana Moon.
April Ipana Troubadours Orchestra Kickin’ a Hole in the Sky and Cooking Breakfast for the One I Love Columbia United States Second song from the musical film Be Yourself!.
May Ruth Etting Ten Cents a Dance and Funny, Dear, What Love Can Do Columbia United States
May The Rondoliers Lazy Lou’siana Moon and Should I? Columbia United States Second song from the musical film Lord Byron of Broadway.
May The High Hatters Send for Me and Ten Cents a Dance Victor United States Orchestra conducted by Leonard Joy. RCA Victor’s best selling record for May 1930.
May George Olsen Orchestra It Happened in Monterey and Song of the Dawn Victor United States From the musical film The King of Jazz.
May Ben Bernie Orchestra To My Mammy and Looking At You Brunswick United States From the musical film Mammy.
May Waring’s Pennsylvanians Thank Your Father and Good for You, Bad for Me Victor United States From the Musical Comedy Flying High.
June Ruth Etting Let Me Sing and I’m Happy and A Cottage for Sale Columbia United States First song from the musical film Mammy.
June Grace Hayes My Lover and I Like to Do Things for You Victor United States From the musical film The King of Jazz.
June Harry Richman Thank Your Father and Without Love Brunswick United States From the musical Flying High.
June Wayne King Orchestra On a Blue and Moonless Night and Promises[disambiguation needed] Victor United States RCA Victor’s best selling record for June 1930.
June Paul Whiteman Orchestra You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me and Livin’ in the Sunlight Columbia United States From the musical film The Big Pond.
June George Olsen Orchestra Montana Call and The Moon is Low Victor United States From the musical film Montana Moon.
June Abe Lyman Orchestra You Will Come Back to Me and Worryin’ Over You Brunswick United States
June Ipana Troubadours Blue Is the Night and Whippoorwill Columbia United States Fist song from the musical film Their Own Desire.
June Leo Reisman Orchestra Happy Feet and I Like to Do Things for You Victor United States From the musical film The King of Jazz.
July The Revelers Sing You Sinners and Across the Breakfast Table Looking at You Victor United States From the musical films Honey and Mammy.
July Grace Hayes On the Sunny Side of the Street and Exactly Like You Victor United States From Lew Leslie’s International Revue.
July Ruth Etting On the Sunny Side of the Street and It Happened in Monterey Columbia United States From Lew Leslie’s International Revue and the musical film The King Of Jazz.
July Harry Richman Ro-Ro-Rollin’ Along and Dream Avenue Columbia United States The second song was composed by Harry Richman himself.
July Leo Reisman Orchestra Rollin’ down the River and Mia Cara Victor United States RCA Victor’s best selling record for July 1930. Second song from the musical film The Big Pond.
July Victor Arden and Phil Ohman Orchestra Ro-Ro-Rollin’ Along and Kiss Me With Your Eyes Victor United States Second tune played by Nat Shilkret Orchestra.
July Fred Rich Orchestra For You and Dream Avenue Columbia United States
July Isham Jones Orchestra What’s The Use? and The Song Without a Name Brunswick United States
July Lloyd Huntley and his Isle o’ Blues Orchestra On a Blue and Moonless Night and Promises[disambiguation needed] Brunswick United States
July Ben Selvin Orchestra Kiss Me With Your Eyes and You Darlin’ Columbia United States
August Noah Beery One Little Drink and The Whip[disambiguation needed] Brunswick United States From the musical films Song Of The Flame and Golden Dawn.
August Ethel Waters You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me and My Kind of A Man Columbia United States From the musical films The Big Pond and Floradora Girl.
August Colonial Club Orchestra Out of Breath and I Am Only Human After All Brunswick United States From the Garrick Gaieties. Orchestra conducted by Bob Haring.
August Rudy Vallee Orchestra Old New England Moon and How Come You Do Me Like You Do? Victor United States
August Henry Thies Orchestra June Kisses and Under Vesuvian Skies Victor United States
August Leo Reisman Orchestra Around the Corner and Bye-Bye Blues Victor United States
September Richard Crooks L’Amour, Toujours, L’Amour and Serenade Victor United States From The Student Prince
September Bob Haring Orchestra All Through the Night[disambiguation needed] and Swingin’ in a Hammock Brunswick United States
September Bert Lown Orchestra Under the Sun It’s Anyone Under the Moon It’s You and Bye Bye Blues Brunswick United States
September Waring’s Pennsylvanians Little White Lies and Gee, But I’d Like to Make You Happy Victor United States Second song from the musical film Good News
October Ruth Etting Don’t Tell Her What’s Happened to Me and The Kiss Waltz Columbia United States Second song from the musical film Dancing Sweeties.
October Guy Lombardo Orchestra Go Home and Tell Your Mother and I’m Doin’ That Thing Victor United States From the musical film Love in the Rough
October Hilo Hawaiian Orchestra On a Little Street in Honolulu and All Through the Night[disambiguation needed] Victor United States Orchestra conducted by Nat Shilkret. RCA Victor’s best selling record for October 1930.
October Paul Whiteman Orchestra Nola and New Tiger Rag Columbia United States
October Tom Gerun Orchestra A Big Bouquet for You and If I Could Be with You Brunswick United States
October Ozzie Nelson Orchestra I Still Get a Thrill and Don’t Mind Walking in the Rain Brunswick United States
November Libby Holman Body and Soul and Something to Remember You By Brunswick United States From the musical Three’s a Crowd.
November Aileen Stanley Wasn’t it Nice? and I’ll Be Blue Just Thinking of You Victor United States
November Jacques Renard Orchestra Sing Something Simple and Lucky Seven Brunswick United States From the musical The Little Show.
November Victor Arden and Phil Ohman Orchestra Fine and Dandy and Can This Be Love? Victor United States From Joe Cook‘s musical show Fine and Dandy.
November Leo Reisman Orchestra Body and Soul and Something to Remember You By Victor United States From the Libby Holman musical Three’s a Crowd.
November Nat Shilkret Orchestra Moonlight on the Colorado and Don’t Tell Her What’s Happened to Me Victor United States RCA Victor’s best selling record for November 1930.
December The Revelers Sing Something Simple and Happy Feet Victor United States Second song from the musical film The King of Jazz.
December Jack Hylton Orchestra Body and Soul and With a Song in My Heart Victor United Kingdom Second song from the musical film Spring Is Here. First from the Libby Holman musical Three’s a Crowd.
December Victor Arden and Phil Ohman Orchestra Embraceable You and I Got Rhythm Victor United States From the George Gershwin musical Girl Crazy.
December Ipana Troubadours Can This Be Love? and Three Little Words Columbia United States Second song from the musical film Check and Double Check. First from the musical Fine and Dandy.
December Tom Gerun Orchestra What a Fool I’ve Been and After All, You’re All I’m After Victor United States
December Nat Shilkret Orchestra Bolero and La Seduccion Brunswick United States RCA Victor’s best selling record for December 1930.

Top hits on record

Sources: Wikipedia, lyrics.com

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